Watersmeet Walk

East Lyn River to Rockford

On the second day of our North Devon holiday, we walked near Watersmeet. It was raining very heavily, so we decided that a woodland walk would probably be a bit more sheltered than being out on the hilltops.

We parked at Hillsford Bridges and walked down alongside Hoar Oak Water towards Watersmeet. There had been a fair bit of rain over the previous few days and the water was high. It was flowing down through the Valley with some force.

Hoar Oak Water Watersmeet

Hoar Oak Water Watersmeet

The first place we stopped was a very convenient photography platform. I stood and watched the waterfall crashing over the rocks and Greg took photos.

When we got down to Watersmeet itself, there is another waterfall on Hoar Oak Water which is the point where Hoar Oak Water meets the East Lyn River. That river had a fair bit of fast flowing water in it.

Hoar Oak Water Watersmeet, Exmoor

Hoar Oak Water Watersmeet, Exmoor

As I watched the rivers meeting and observed the force and velocity of water, I was reminded of the flood that devastated Lynmouth – which is at the bottom of this Valley – in 1952. The water levels today were a lot less than they would have been on that fateful night, however, with that volume of water surging down the Valley and meeting the West Lyn River in Lynmouth, the village never really had a chance.

Watersmeet Lynmouth

Watersmeet Lynmouth

We walked along the East Lyn River towards Rockford, in the Brendon Valley.

East Lyn River at Rockford, Exmoor

East Lyn River at Rockford, Exmoor

We stopped at the Rockford Hotel and had a cream tea, with what can safely be called a humungous scone and jam and cream!

Afternoon Tea at Rockford Inn, Exmoor

Afternoon Tea at Rockford Inn, Exmoor

Greg got some fantastic shots of fast swirling water, crashing over the rocks.

East Lyn River, Watersmeet, Exmoor

East Lyn River, Watersmeet, Exmoor

 

East Lyn River at Watersmeet, Lynmouth, Exmoor

East Lyn River at Watersmeet, Lynmouth, Exmoor

We got thoroughly soaked and were very glad to get back to the warm National Trust Tea Rooms at Watersmeet.

This had been a very different experience from the last time that we were here with the girls a few summers ago, when the water was much calmer and we had walked up from Lynmouth.

My original plan had been to walk up over the top to Summerhouse Hill and down to Watersmeet that way, however, given the amount of rain we experienced that day, I was glad we didn’t do that.

As we got back to the car, as a pair of very soggy, drowned rats, the rain stopped and the sun came out!

We decided to drive back over the moors and go via Dunkery Beacon, which is the highest point on Exmoor. It looked like it was going to rain again, so this was quite a brisk walk to the top. Again, the clouds cleared away and we had some spectacular views of the countryside.

Dunkery Beacon, Exmoor

Dunkery Beacon, Exmoor

View form Dunkery Beacon, Exmoor

View form Dunkery Beacon, Exmoor

It was a fabulous couple of days with plenty of hills to get my leg muscles working!

I just wish we lived closer, so I could walk there more frequently! A few more miles on my #walk1000miles challenge.

Amanda

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Valley of the Rocks and Lynton Walk

Southcliffe Walk

Just after Easter, I went home to North Devon for a few days. I wanted to walk and there were a couple of places I had in mind that I had not visited in ages.

One place was the Valley of Rocks and Lynton.

We parked in the Valley of Rocks and started the climb up over Southcliffe. I have always loved this side of the Valley. There tends to be fewer people than on the opposite side, which is the wooded Hollerday Hill side. As a child I used to walk here and it was part of my regular horse-riding route.

Valley of Rocks from Southcliffe, Lynton, Exmoor

Valley of Rocks from Southcliffe, Lynton, Exmoor

Interestingly, the sign at one end calls it South Cleave and the sign at the other end calls it Southcliffe. Both words mean the same thing, although I had never heard it referred to as a Cleave before.

It was a typical Spring day, with weather ranging from brilliant sunshine to rain and hail!

You see the Valley from quite a different perspective from this side.

Lynton from top of Southcliffe, North Devon

Lynton from top of Southcliffe, North Devon

We walked up over the top and nearly got blown away as we rounded the corner. For some reason, this corner is one of the windiest spots known to humankind and definitely required a woolley hat. It was a favourite spot for flying kites when I was younger as you were always guaranteed to have plenty of wind.

Top of Southcliffe, Valley of Rocks, Lynton

Top of Southcliffe, Valley of Rocks, Lynton

 

Southcliffe looking down on Valley of Rocks, Lynton

Southcliffe looking down on Valley of Rocks, Lynton

We walked over the top and down the other side towards Lee Abbey. Unfortunately it was too early in the year for the Tea Gardens to be open, which was a real shame.

We looked down on Lee Bay, where I had spent many a happy hour building sand-castles and climbing on rocks with my Nan and my cousins, when we were all quite little.

Lee Bay, Lynton, Devon

Lee Bay, Lynton, Devon

 

Lee Bay, Valley of Rocks, Lynton, Exmoor

Lee Bay, Valley of Rocks, Lynton, Exmoor

Amidst the snow and rain, we walked back into the Valley of Rocks and walked along the North Walk back towards Lynton. North Walk is a path that is cut in the side of the cliff, with a sheer drop straight down to the crashing waves of the Bristol Channel below.

Castle Rock in the Valley of Rocks, Lynton

Castle Rock in the Valley of Rocks, Lynton

By the time we got to Lynton, we were in need of a large home-made ice-cream.

I thoroughly enjoyed my Windswept Walk. It added a few more miles to my #walk1000miles Challenge

Amanda

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Review of Independent Guide to London 2016

London by a Londoner

This is a very useful guide.  I would highly recommend it to anyone to use whilst planning a trip, as well as to carry with you whilst actually in London.

Independent Guide to London Front Cover

This guide is clearly written by someone who knows every inch of London like the back of his hand. His passion for the city shows through in every word.

Independent Guide to London Back Cover

Travel and Transport

There is lot of detailed information on travelling to and around London. This includes clear information on the cost of various methods of transport, which is great for budgeting.  There are some great tips in this section, including ways of paying for your transport in London, especially as London Buses no longer take cash as payment for travel. I had never thought about using River Transport to get from one place to another and I did not know about the popularity of cycle hire to see London.

I would suggest reading this section in detail before you travel to London because it will save you a lot of money and clearly explain exactly how to get about – at any time of day!

Top 10 Attractions

The guidebook is laid out with the Top 10 attractions and then there are several more detailed sections. These include the major attractions, how to get to them, opening times and cost of entry. The author points out possible limitations, such as unsuitability for children or access restrictions due to the age of the building.

Where to Eat

In each section there are 3 – 5 suggested eating establishments, which cover a range of culinary styles as well as catering to different budgets. The author has clearly eaten in every one of these places and makes recommendations for his personal favourites, as well as offering alternatives. He gives a guide to the price of the food as well as dress code where relevant.

There is also an excellent section on Fine Dining across the city, with indications of the very best restaurants, their current chefs and their Michelin Star Rating.

A must read section is the one on Afternoon Tea, as no visit to London would be complete without sampling that most English of Traditions.

Areas of London

In each of the Area sections, the author offers a selection of personal recommendations for accommodation and expected costs. This is much better than having a thick book full of listings and not knowing which one to pick.

I have visited London on numerous occasions in the past and thought I had seen most of the major attractions however the author has managed to surprise me with this guide. He talks about several very interesting, yet little known places to visit, which are often cheaper than the major attractions – and sometimes even free. There is at least one thing in each of the sections that I did not know existed and would include in another trip.

Saving Money in London

There is a very helpful section on saving money on your trip to London. The Capital City can be expensive, however you can reduce those costs in a number of ways, including smarter ways to pay for your travel and grouping together tickets for your attractions, especially if they are operated by the same company. You can save a lot of money by being organised and buying your tickets in advance online.

I had a printed copy of the book and the only criticism I would have is that the website links that are printed in the book are quite faint, so they are not easy to read.

I enjoyed this Independent Guide to London 2016 and I shall definitely be using it for planning my next trip to London.

Independent Guide Books

One of the unique features of the Independent Guidebooks series is that the books are updated throughout the year and printed on demand, so when you buy the book you will have the latest published version. This means that unlike big publishing houses that print thousands at a time and write up to 18 months in advance, these Guide Books have all the latest developments when you buy.

The book is available as both a printed book and a digital version and is available from Amazon.

Amazon US

Amazon UK

Have fun in London.

Amanda Goldston

 

 

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Walk over Rivington Pike and Winter Hill, Bolton, Lancashire

Rivington Pike and Winter Hill, West Peninne Moors

Today, Saturday 26th February 2016, was Football Day! My husband, Greg, is a keen Bolton Wanderers supporter, so we decided to have a walk over Rivington Pike just outside of Bolton before the game as part of my #walk1000miles Challenge.

We walked up to the Pidgeon Tower first of all. Apparently there used to be Chinese Gardens here many years ago, which have fallen into disrepair. It seems like there is now funding available to restore them to their former glory.

Pigeon Tower Rivington, Bolton

Pigeon Tower Rivington, Bolton

Amanda at the Pigeon Tower, Rivington

Amanda at the Pigeon Tower, Rivington

We then walked UP further to Rivington Pike. This was over 500 feet/ 150 metres almost straight up from the car park. The views are stunning and it is well worth the climb, even if my calves disagreed with so many steps!

Rivington Pike in the Distance

Rivington Pike in the Distance

Up the steps to Rivington Pike

Up the steps to Rivington Pike

View from the top of Rivington Pike

View from the top of Rivington Pike

We had our picnic lunch at the top. By this time, it was getting on for 1pm and Greg was itching to get going because the football game kicked off at 3pm and he still had 3 miles to walk downhill to the football stadium.

The Lancashire Countryside from Rivington Pike

The Lancashire Countryside from Rivington Pike

We set off at a brisk pace and soon came to the point where he continued his downhill journey and I started my climb up to the top of Winter Hill. I climbed over 400 feet/ 125 m up to some stones which were set on a ridge.

Stones on the Moorland near Rivington

Stones on the Moorland near Rivington

I thought this was the top and it would be a straight walk across the ridge to the TV masts, but it wasn’t as simple as that.  The path dropped down a little and then started another ascent to the very top of Winter Hill.

View of the Moors from the top of Winter Hill, Lancashire

View of the Moors from the top of Winter Hill, Lancashire

In total there was over 800 feet / approximately 250 metres height difference from the car park to the top of Winter Hill! No wonder my legs were complaining!

From there I came around the masts to what I thought was the path down over the other side. I looked as people and animals had walked along it quite regularly. It was more “path-like” in some parts. In other places it was very boggy and marshy. The path seemed to pick its way through the worst of the reeds and water.

There was only one place where I completely misjudged the solidness- or lack of it- of the ground and my boot sunk into the bog and I fell on my bottom. Fortunately I had my walking pole with me and was able to use that as a leverage to pull myself up. I had not put on my waterproof trousers as I thought the walk would be quite dry, so I spent the rest of the walk with a very wet, soggy and muddy bottom.

Soggy Muddy Boots

Soggy Muddy Boots

I have discovered that I need to brush up on my map reading skills as I re-joined the road in a completely different place than I thought I would. I was glad I was out walking on a dry day, in a popular spot with plenty of people around me. When I fell over, there was a group of 3 other walkers not far behind me, so I am sure they would have helped me if I had been really stuck.

I would not have wanted to be out here on my own any later in the day or in foggy conditions.

I was glad to get back to the car and enjoy the last of my warm tea from my thermos.

I then realised that I had not brought a full change of clothes with me. For some reason I had thought to pack spare knickers and socks, but nothing else. The only option I had was to change into my perfectly-dry waterproof trousers, which were waiting for me in the boot of the car. Hereby followed a frantic attempt to divest myself of three layers of wet walking trousers, whilst also trying to look inconspicuous in a public car park!

I still managed to get back to the football ground before the end of the game to collect Greg.

I have realised there is a huge difference between walking 8 – 10 miles along flat canal paths and following a 5 mile circular route that has and 800 feet/ 250 m climb in the middle of it!

Well, I have dubbed myself as the “Mountain Walking Girl – with a love of Fine Cake” and my ultimate aim is to live in a mountainous area, where I can walk and write, then I need to get myself physically ready to do that.

I realised today that I have come a long way since January, but I still have a lot to do to get myself ready for Mountain Living. It is a Walking Work in Progress and I have this #walk1000mile challenge from Country Walking Magazine to thank for getting me motivated to take the actions I need to take to live my DreamLife.

Amanda and Greg

 

 

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Walk up The Wrekin, Shropshire

Wrekin Walk with Greg

Today, Friday 26th February 2016, Greg and I decided we would walk up the Wrekin, near Telford in Shropshire as part of my #walk1000miles Challenge. It is about an hour drive from us. The last time we went up the Wrekin was in July 2014 and we were both considerably lighter and much fitter.

View from the top of the Wrekin, Shropshire

View from the top of the Wrekin, Shropshire

We followed Route card number 09 from the March 2015 edition of Country Walking Magazine. We left off the smaller Ercall Hill at the start.

I have discovered that, much to my annoyance, my husband, Greg, seems to be much fitter than I am. He set off up the paths with great gusto, whereas it was a lot more effort for me. I was quite surprised at this because I have walked a lot in the last few weeks and thought that I was getting much fitter. I am certainly fitter than I was in January.

I have done a fair few miles along flat canal paths and gently undulating terrain, however my legs were not prepared for a climb of over 900 feet / 300 metres in one afternoon – even if that was in two stages with a fairly level part in between! My calves were objecting quite loudly!

You can tell which people go up and down the Wrekin regularly as these were the ones who were striding out towards the top without even breaking into a sweat, or even running up and down the paths, with dogs trying to keep up with them. Hmm, I don’t think Greg or I are quite at that level yet!

The weather was overcast however it was great for walking. It was cold and windy in places and the air was distinctly chilly when we were out of the sunshine.

South Side Walking

We walked along the lower path and around the South side.

The lower path is mostly through woodland, where the paths are well-maintained and fairly dry – Hooray! Mud Free on the Way!

You eventually come to a part which involves a steep climb, straight right up to the rocky outcrops at the top and up to the Summit.

Straight Right up the side of the Wrekin, Shropshire

Straight Right up the side of the Wrekin, Shropshire

The views were reasonable today although we could not see as far as you can on a clear Summer day.

Climbing up The Wrekin

Climbing up The Wrekin

View from the top of the South Side of The Wrekin, Shropshire

View from the top of the South Side of The Wrekin, Shropshire

Craggy Rocks and Stunning Views at the top of The Wrekin

Craggy Rocks and Stunning Views at the top of The Wrekin

We had our cup of tea at the Summit before making our way back down, using the wider, more-regularly-used path back to the carpark.

View from the Top of The Wrekin

View from the Top of The Wrekin

Amanda at the top of The Wrekin

Amanda at the top of The Wrekin

A welcome, warm Cup of Tea at the Top of The Wrekin

A welcome, warm Cup of Tea at the Top of The Wrekin

This was a very pleasant 4.5 mile circular walk.

Amanda and Greg Goldston

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Tamworth to Alvecote Walk along the Coventry Canal

I started my walk by joining the Coventry Canal at Kettlebrook, Tamworth, which is just over a mile from my house. On looking at the map later, I could have walked part way up the Glascote Road and joined the canal further up towards Alvecote.

I had worked out from the map that it was approximately four miles and that proved to be accurate. The Canal took me through Glascote and Amington and then on to the Marina at Alvecote. We have driven this route a lot, however I have never walked along this stretch of the canal.

Alvecote Marina, Coventry Canal, Warwickshire

Alvecote Marina, Coventry Canal, Warwickshire

Walking along the canal is a more direct route than we have taken previously and it has shown me parts of the town that I have not previously seen, and from a different perspective.

We have frequently started our walks from Alvecote and walked the other way to Polesworth, as it is the start of Pooley Nature Reserve, but I had never previously been into Alvecote Marina itself and never walked in the direction from which I had come.

Usual Walking Direction from Alvecote into Pooley Nature Reserve

Usual Walking Direction from Alvecote into Pooley Nature Reserve

I had my cup of tea at the ruins of the old Alvecote Priory, which was a Benedictine Monastery dating back to the 12th century.

Alvecote Priory, Coventry Canal, Warwickshire

Alvecote Priory, Coventry Canal, Warwickshire

It was very quiet and peaceful there and I could have stayed there all day.

I walked back to Tamworth the same way I had come. In total it was 8 miles, although Endomondo stopped working on the way back, so the walk was split over two records.

Amanda

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Canals and Lakes in a Circular Walk from Tamworth

I started my walk today by picking up the Coventry Canal in Kettlebrook, Tamworth, which is just over a mile from my front door.  I walked along the Canal to Fazeley Junction and sat down on one of the benches beside the canal for a very welcome cup of tea. I have started taking a flask of tea with me on my longer walks.

Fazeley Junction

Fazeley Junction

I watched the swans for a while and then set off along the Birmingham and Fazeley Canal towards Kingsbury Water Park. This canal continues right into the heart of Birmingham, but that is an 18 mile walk in one direction, so maybe that will be another walk.

The paths were quite firm and dry with very little mud, which is great.

I have noticed that canal paths tend to be a very direct route from one place to another and seem to me to be shorter than following the same routes by car.

It is very interesting to see how my view point of the landscape changes as I am now seeing the same spaces and routes from a completely different perspective.

I have become quite fascinated by the different architecture of the various bridges across the canal, including this one, which is a foot bridge at Drayton Bassett, just beyond Drayton Manor Theme Park. It has a little turret at each end, with precariously winding stone steps.

Drayton Footbridge, Birmingham and Fazeley Canal

Drayton Footbridge, Birmingham and Fazeley Canal

 

Spiral Stone Staircase Drayton FootBridge

Spiral Stone Staircase Drayton FootBridge

I walked along until I came to the entrance to Middleton Lakes. This is a Nature Reserve and RSPB protected area. It is a wetland area that is home to a huge plethora of birds and, as such, is a birdwatcher and photographer’s paradise.

Middleton Lakes RSPB Nature Reserve, Staffordshire

Middleton Lakes RSPB Nature Reserve, Staffordshire

Not surprisingly, this was the wettest and muddiest part of the walk.

I had seen from my Ordnance Survey map that there should be a path around the outside, which crosses the river Tame and back up over to hill to Dosthill and then back to Tamworth.

Dosthill Mountainside, Tamworth, Staffordshire

Dosthill Mountainside, Tamworth, Staffordshire

I walk almost an extra mile trying to find this path. I went down a lot of paths through the wetland undergrowth that looked like proper paths and had the appearance that someone or something, that was bigger than a small animal, had used them regularly. They all ended up in muddy quagmires or with an impassable fence.

Long Grass Footpath around Middleton Lakes

Long Grass Footpath around Middleton Lakes

I eventually found the right path and walked up a large hill, which the map calls Dosthill Mountainside. The area is covered in trees and is a little piece of greenery that I did not know existed. The views from the top were spectacular. I had not realised how many lakes and ponds there are between Kingsbury Water Park and Tamworth, including Middleton Lakes in the middle.

View of Middleton Lakes from Dosthill Mountainside

View of Middleton Lakes from Dosthill Mountainside

I had planned to pick up the path that took me along by the old quarry and through fields, however I missed this and ended up walking back to Tamworth along the pavement. That last 3 miles walking on tarmac was very hard on my hips and knees.

I have also now discovered that you can walk from Dosthill back to Tamworth Park without touching the main road, although the paths come into the park in places that I would not have expected, which explains why I have missed them on previous occasions when I have tried to walk in the Dosthill direction.

It was quite a warm, sunny day, although it was chilly out of the sun. It was a hat-on, hat-off day and I found myself stopping every few hundred metres to either put my hat on because I was cold or to take it off because my head was sweating.

I walked just over 10 miles in total today.

Amanda

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Stroll around Kingsbury Water Park

Greg and I went for a walk around Kingsbury Water Park, near Tamworth, this morning as part of my #walk1000miles challenge.

We walked around the opposite way to the way we usually go. We only walked a couple of miles in as many hours because we were taking photographs and Greg was giving me some more photography lessons, especially on how to get better photographs out of my phone.

It was windy, although it was not particularly cold and the sky was quite non-descript, so photographs were a bit challenging.

There were sailing boats out on one of the lakes.

Sailing Boat at Kingsbury Water Park

Sailing Boat at Kingsbury Water Park

And people on jetskis on another lake.

Jet Skier at Kingsbury Water Park

Jet Skier at Kingsbury Water Park

I was quite surprised to see Crocuses blooming, although the weather has been so wet and mild, it is hardly surprising that flowers think that Spring has already arrived.

Crocuses at Kingsbury Water Park

Crocuses at Kingsbury Water Park

There were also plenty of water fowl to be seen, including large swans and greylag geese.

Swan at Kingsbury Water Park

Swan at Kingsbury Water Park

 

GreyLag Geese at Kingsbury Water Park

GreyLag Geese at Kingsbury Water Park

No visit to Kingsbury Water Park is complete without taking some pictures of the ponies who live near the bridge.

Pony at Kingsbury Water Park

Pony at Kingsbury Water Park

The paths were actually quite dry, so maybe we are finally seeing an end to the mud??

I had not actually realised the full extent of Kingsbury Water Park and just how many pools there are to explore. That will give me plenty of walking opportunities next week, when there are fewer people around.

Amanda and Greg

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Snowdrop Valley, Wheddon Cross, Exmoor

During the month of February, there is a fabulous display of Snowdrops in a tucked away valley in the middle of Exmoor.

Despite growing up in North Devon, I had never been to Snowdrop Valley. When I saw it featured in the February edition of Country Walking Magazine, I decided it was a must-visit.

The magazine suggested a 13.5 km/ 8.5 mile walk which incorporated nearby Dunkery Beacon, which is the highest point on Exmoor. On a dry, sunny day this would be a fabulous walk, with stunning, far-reaching views.

However, on the day we went, it was raining quite heavily and was as we got out of the car at Wheddon Cross, it started to sleet. Dunkery Beacon was not even visible, which considering it is less than two miles away, was not a good sign.

Greg parked in the car park and the first thing I did was slip on my bottom on a muddy bank. That was before I had put my waterproof trousers on, so that was a great start!

We decided to take the bus down to Snowdrop Valley. This only runs during February and cost £5 per person for a return trip. The road to the Valley is very narrow and is closed to walkers during February, so the only other option is walk down through the fields.

Having seen the mud in the car park and guessed that this would probably be a lot worse on the footpaths to get to the Valley, we opted for the bus journey.

Snowdrop Valley has its own micro climate and the weather was much better down there than it was at the top. Although it was cold, it had at least stopped raining.

The Valley itself is only about a mile as a circular route.

 Snow Drop Valley, Wheddon Cross, Exmoor

Snow Drop Valley, Wheddon Cross, Exmoor

More muddy paths!

Amanda by the River Avill, Snowdrop Valley, Exmoor

Amanda by the River Avill, Snowdrop Valley, Exmoor

Today was much more about Greg taking photographs than it was about walking very far. We walked around the Valley twice, once to look for photographic spots and the second time to actually take photos.

River Avill at Snowdrop Vally, Wheddon Cross, Exmoor , © 2016 Gregory Goldston

River Avill at Snowdrop Vally, Wheddon Cross, Exmoor , © 2016 Gregory Goldston

Greg got some lovely shots.

Snowdrops at Snowdrop Valley, Wheddon Cross, Exmoor, © 2016 Gregory Goldston

Snowdrops at Snowdrop Valley, Wheddon Cross, Exmoor, © 2016 Gregory Goldston

 

Three Snowdrops at Snowdrop Valley, Wheddon Cross, Exmoor, © 2016 Gregory Goldston

Three Snowdrops at Snowdrop Valley, Wheddon Cross, Exmoor, © 2016 Gregory Goldston

 

Cluster of Snowdrops, Snowdrop Valley, Wheddon Cross, Exmoor, © 2016 Gregory Goldston

Cluster of Snowdrops, Snowdrop Valley, Wheddon Cross, Exmoor, © 2016 Gregory Goldston

The snowdrops had blossomed early because of the mild, damp weather. They were already starting to droop over, so they probably will not be around much longer.

Carpet of Snowdrops at Snowdrop Valley, Wheddon Cross, Exmoor, © 2016 Gregory Goldston

Carpet of Snowdrops at Snowdrop Valley, Wheddon Cross, Exmoor, © 2016 Gregory Goldston

We spent a good couple of hours there, by which time I was getting cold and was ready for a cup of tea. The buses run every twenty minutes, so we caught the next one back. The return journey is very pretty as it takes you right the way down through the valley and back up to Wheddon Cross in a circular journey.

From the car park, we drove up to the car park at Dunkery Bridge, with a view to having our lunch and walking up to Dunkery Beacon. However it was still sleeting and the Beacon was still not visible, which is should have been at that height, so we went for a drive over the ridge and took some pictures from the other side, looking back towards Dunkery Beacon.

Dunkery Ridge, Dunkery, Exmoor, © 2016 Gregory Goldston

Dunkery Ridge, Dunkery, Exmoor, © 2016 Gregory Goldston

By this time it was after 3pm and I really was ready for a cup of tea and a slice of cake. Unfortunately the Exmoor House Hotel closed for afternoon tea at 3pm as they had to prepare for dinner, so we went to the local village hall and enjoyed a very welcome mug of tea and a large slice of delicious, home-made chocolate cake, as provided by the local WI (Women’s Institute).

The original plan had been to stay to watch the sunset, but, with thick, overcast cloud along with rain and sleet, it was obvious there was not going to be a visible sunset, so we headed for home.

It was a long journey as it was nearly 200 miles each way, however it was worth it.

Amanda and Greg

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