Watersmeet Walk

East Lyn River to Rockford

On the second day of our North Devon holiday, we walked near Watersmeet. It was raining very heavily, so we decided that a woodland walk would probably be a bit more sheltered than being out on the hilltops.

We parked at Hillsford Bridges and walked down alongside Hoar Oak Water towards Watersmeet. There had been a fair bit of rain over the previous few days and the water was high. It was flowing down through the Valley with some force.

Hoar Oak Water Watersmeet

Hoar Oak Water Watersmeet

The first place we stopped was a very convenient photography platform. I stood and watched the waterfall crashing over the rocks and Greg took photos.

When we got down to Watersmeet itself, there is another waterfall on Hoar Oak Water which is the point where Hoar Oak Water meets the East Lyn River. That river had a fair bit of fast flowing water in it.

Hoar Oak Water Watersmeet, Exmoor

Hoar Oak Water Watersmeet, Exmoor

As I watched the rivers meeting and observed the force and velocity of water, I was reminded of the flood that devastated Lynmouth – which is at the bottom of this Valley – in 1952. The water levels today were a lot less than they would have been on that fateful night, however, with that volume of water surging down the Valley and meeting the West Lyn River in Lynmouth, the village never really had a chance.

Watersmeet Lynmouth

Watersmeet Lynmouth

We walked along the East Lyn River towards Rockford, in the Brendon Valley.

East Lyn River at Rockford, Exmoor

East Lyn River at Rockford, Exmoor

We stopped at the Rockford Hotel and had a cream tea, with what can safely be called a humungous scone and jam and cream!

Afternoon Tea at Rockford Inn, Exmoor

Afternoon Tea at Rockford Inn, Exmoor

Greg got some fantastic shots of fast swirling water, crashing over the rocks.

East Lyn River, Watersmeet, Exmoor

East Lyn River, Watersmeet, Exmoor

 

East Lyn River at Watersmeet, Lynmouth, Exmoor

East Lyn River at Watersmeet, Lynmouth, Exmoor

We got thoroughly soaked and were very glad to get back to the warm National Trust Tea Rooms at Watersmeet.

This had been a very different experience from the last time that we were here with the girls a few summers ago, when the water was much calmer and we had walked up from Lynmouth.

My original plan had been to walk up over the top to Summerhouse Hill and down to Watersmeet that way, however, given the amount of rain we experienced that day, I was glad we didn’t do that.

As we got back to the car, as a pair of very soggy, drowned rats, the rain stopped and the sun came out!

We decided to drive back over the moors and go via Dunkery Beacon, which is the highest point on Exmoor. It looked like it was going to rain again, so this was quite a brisk walk to the top. Again, the clouds cleared away and we had some spectacular views of the countryside.

Dunkery Beacon, Exmoor

Dunkery Beacon, Exmoor

View form Dunkery Beacon, Exmoor

View form Dunkery Beacon, Exmoor

It was a fabulous couple of days with plenty of hills to get my leg muscles working!

I just wish we lived closer, so I could walk there more frequently! A few more miles on my #walk1000miles challenge.

Amanda

Be Sociable, Share!