Mountain Nourishment on Snowdon

On Monday, Greg and I took a trip to Snowdonia National Park. I was in dire need of some “Mountain Nourishment” – that is to say, clean, clear fresh air, cold and height! At 1085 m (3650 ft), Snowdon definitely met that criteria!

We drove to Llanberis, which is the base of the Snowdon mountain railway. We parked in the car park, at £7 for the day, which was quite reasonable and were given a £4 food and drink voucher for the local Victoria Hotel. I thought 2 coffees for the princely sum of 50p was the bargain of the day!

We caught the train at 12.30pm and spent the next hour slowly chugging up the mountain side to the station at the summit.

Snowdon Mountain Railway

Snowdon Mountain Railway Diesel Train

 

Amanda on the Snowdon Mountain Railway

Amanda on the Snowdon Mountain Railway

 

Greg on the Snowdon Mountain Railway

Greg on the Snowdon Mountain Railway

The views were spectacular, as the weather was clear on the way up. The sun was shining and there was no sign of any clouds, as this was forecast for much later in the day.

Going up to the top of Snowdon

Going up to the top of Snowdon

We decided to go to the viewpoint at the very top first and I am glad we did, because a bank of low cloud and fog started to come in, and very soon the whole station was lost in cloud.

The views were absolutely spectacular and we could see for miles in every direction. We managed to get some great photos before we lost visibility and decided to go and get some lunch in the cafe.

From the top of Snowdon

From the top of Snowdon

 

Top of Snowdon

Top of Snowdon

 

Amanda on Top of the World

Amanda on Top of the World

We had always intended to take the train up the mountain and walk back down to Llanberis, however as I looked at the fog and cloud, I began to wonder whether this was a wise idea. Greg assured me that we would soon walk through the cloud and that it would be better on the way down.

So, we set off down the mountain. The Llanberis path is approximately 5 miles from top to bottom and has a difference of over 3000ft, 1000m, from top to bottom.

Going down Snowdon in the Fog

Going down Snowdon in the Fog

Although a bit apprehensive about walking through the fog, I knew that this path is probably the easiest path. It is also the most popular path and so there were likely to be plenty of people around if we needed any help.

The path was harder than we thought it would be. In places it was very steep and in other places the path was very rough and uneven. Other parts were made up of large stepping stones, which had been laid in that way to stop the path falling away, but they were some of the hardest parts.

On our way down Snowdon

On our way down Snowdon

 

Looking back at the top of Snowdon

Looking back at the top of Snowdon

We had been advised by a fellow passenger on the train that one of the hardest parts was the tarmac road at the very end. He was right, as that part was very steep and was quite hard going on the knees.

By the time we got to the bottom, it was starting to get dark and I was very glad to see my car waiting in the car park. Our legs were really aching and we both knew we had just walked five miles- downhill!

It was an awesome day and it was well worth the effort. It is something I have wanted to do for ages. We have both come to the conclusion that we need to be considerably fitter than we are right now before we tackle Snowdon again, and especially before we attempt to walk UP the mountain.

Mountain Top

Mountain Top

This had all come about in the first place by Inspiration from an article about walking on the different routes of Snowdon, which was featured in the June Edition of Country Walking Magazine.

Amanda

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