Barranco del Infierno Walk

On the recommendation of Alan, our presenter in the CLC Paradise Resort, we decided to tackle the Barranco del Infierno (Hell’s Gorge), which is located in Adeje, just a short taxi ride from the resort. We booked our trip through the reception of the resort. We had booked for 10am, although we ended up getting there for 9.30am. We had to sign a disclaimer and were issued with hard hats, which have to be worn all along the walk, as there is a danger of falling rocks in places.

Barranco del Infierno, Adeje, Tenerife , ©2016 Gregory Goldston

Barranco del Infierno, Adeje, Tenerife , ©2016 Gregory Goldston

As we got further up into the Ravine and could see the rocks overhanging on both sides, we could quite see why this is the case.

Barrnaco del Infierno Path ©2016 Amanda Goldston

Barrnaco del Infierno Path ©2016 Amanda Goldston

It is a very old ravine, where caves and artefacts have been found that suggest this was an important area for the Guanches people (600- 1000 AD). It is a very important nature area with hundreds of varieties of plants and other fauna. In an attempt to preserve the environment here, entry is restricted to only 300 people per day.

Barranco Del Infierno Cliffs ©2016 Amanda Goldston

Barranco Del Infierno Cliffs ©2016 Amanda Goldston

My Endomondo tracker said it was 6.37 miles/ about 10 km. The estimated time for the trail is about 3 hours. The path is well-maintained. There is a total height difference from the lowest point about 350 metres above sea level to the highest point about 880 metres. For us, the temperature ranged between 24 and 32 degrees C, so it was very hot. We were walking between 9.30 am and 1pm, so it got progressively hotter as we walked along.

There are several places to stop and take photographs with guides along the way. From a certain point they ask that you keep walking and don’t stop for photographs, as there is a possibility of falling rocks.

It is quite a spectacular walk, with a huge variation of scenery, ranging from the open, arid and exposed paths at the start of the walk to the lush, almost tropical valley at the bottom of the gorge. It is well worth the walk to the waterfall at the end. The waterfall has a height of over 200 metres and is located in a cavern at the end, where the overhanging rocks form a tunnel of light up at the top.

Barranco del Infierno Waterfall ©2016 Amanda Goldston

Barranco del Infierno Waterfall ©2016 Amanda Goldston

We were tired when we got back, however it was well worth the effort. The lady in the kiosk very kindly called us a taxi to take us back to the resort. I was glad that we did not walk up or down the steep incline from the village square to the entrance to the walk.

It was not something we had spotted in the guide book beforehand, so we were very grateful to Alan for telling us about it.

Amanda Barranco Del Infierno End

Amanda Barranco Del Infierno End of Walk

The Barranco del Infierno is open from 08:00 am until 18:30 (6.30 pm) although last entrance is 14:30 (2.30pm). As there are only 300 visitors a day allowed in the Gorge, it is advisable to book in advance. It can be closed after heavy rain, so it is best to check before you go.

Amanda

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